Dry Needling Clinical Effectiveness/Results At North Jersey Physical Therapy Associates

By Carol Cote, PT, CCTT, CODN, CMTPT

Dry needling of trigger points has unprecedented results in patient care treatment protocols when addressing orthopedic, musculoskeletal, neuromuscular and chronic pain conditions. We at North Jersey Physical Therapy have fully integrated dry needling of myofascial trigger points as part of our rehabilitation treatment protocols that include manual myofascial release, neuromuscular rehabilitation and exercise. Some observations/results with dry needling are unattainable via traditional physical therapy.

Dry needling releases the muscles’ contractures (trigger points) in both muscles and myofascial bands in soft tissue pain while facilitating a more balanced muscle activation pattern. We believe dry needling when combined with manual myofascial release and active release treatment strategies creates a change in the motor cortex, cerebellum and sensory cortex. Dry needling facilitates a change in muscle tone, muscle memory and activation patterns while relieving muscle pain. There is frequently sustained pain relief and perceived lightness/proprioception to the movement.

The human brain learns movement by doing and feeling which becomes habit which then becomes more hard wired. For example, riding a bike is an example of a muscle memory habit. We don’t have to think about how to ride a bike once we’ve learned it (body felt learning). If however, our habits over work key muscles and tendons during our grip, elbow and wrist, tendonitis of the elbow develops as a result when wear and tear exceeds repair. Dry needling the muscles and fascial bands allows immediate release of painful trigger points while also creating an inhibitive influence not to over contract those
muscles that habitually (through muscle memory) get overused. The human brain is
linked to habit and we are unaware of this process.

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